Infamy

Photo of SSG John D. Barker

SSG John D. Barker US Army 1941 – 1945

As I begin writing this article, it is the same time that 75 years ago today, nearly 2,500 sailors, soldiers, and marines lives would be tragically and suddenly ended or changed forever. A carefree assignment on an island paradise in the Pacific turned into a fury of chaos, confusion, and death.

Scott Barker and I served in the US Army Military Police together in the 1970’s. After his service in the Army, Scott joined the FBI and has now retired.

Scott’s late father, SSG John D. Barker – US Army 1941 – 1945, was at Pearl Harbor on that day. Scott’s father did not talk much about it until his later years. Continue reading

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather

Fifteen Years Later

Fifteen years ago we were viciously attacked.  The enemy was not a nation with a flag.  It was an ideology of hate and domination.  We witnessed heroic actions of Americans.

Today we remember and honor those who fell on that day as well as those who have since fallen in the war against terror. We pray for those who are still fighting that war.
On that day in 2001 and the days following, America came together.  Images of fire fighters raising the American flag in the rubble of the Twin Towers displayed our resolve. Continue reading

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather

Veterans Group Questions Bishop’s Military Service

A Veterans group blog site recently filed a Freedom of Information request regarding Congressman Sanford Bishop’s claim to be an Army veteran. They posted the response on their blog and the Facebook page of the 2nd District Republican Party.

Congressman Bishop’s official biography reads, “He served in the U.S. Army from 1969 to 1971; completed basic training at Fort Benning, Georgia, entered Advanced Reserve Officers Training, and received an Honorable Discharge in 1971.” Continue reading

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather

Perpetual Half Mast

Have you ever reached for the radio dial to find a news station when you saw a flag flying at half mast? Two words probably ran through your mind. “Who died?”

When a flag was at half mast, it meant that a senior statesman died or there was a tragic event. When a flag was at half mast, it got your attention. It stood out.

Today, our flag is at perpetual half mast. Victims of terrorist attacks have barely been laid to rest before we hear of another attack. Continue reading

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather

D-Day Remembered

On June 6, 1944, thousands of young men from across our nation had either already suited up with paratrooper gear and loaded into an airplane to jump out over France or were on landing craft moving across the English Channel.

President Roosevelt, General Eisenhower, and a relatively few strategic planners knew what was taking place. They knew that even if there was 100% certainty of a successful mission ( and there was no certainty of success), there was also a 100% certainty that thousands of those men would never return to their homes.

Normandy Cemetery

Normandy Cemetery – American Battle Monuments Commission

President Roosevelt addressed the nation with a prayer. I invite you to take 5 minutes to listen to his prayer and read the text as you listen to this. If you have a child or grandchild, pull them aside to tell them what happened on this day. Continue reading

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather

Memorial Day

Headstones with American Flag

A small piece of land in Southwest Georgia marks the final resting place of about 20,000 men and women who served our nation. Nearly 13,000 of those died on those grounds in the 1860’s during the civil war. Last weekend, members of Scout troops and other organizations placed a small American flag by each tombstone at the Andersonville National Cemetery.

What we now know as Memorial Day was first commemorated after the civil war and was originally called Decoration Day. At the Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia on, May 30, 1868, then Congressman and future President James Garfield, addressed a crowd of 5,000 gathered. His opening words at that address sum up what Memorial Day means.

“I am oppressed with a sense of the impropriety of uttering words on this occasion. If silence is ever golden, it must be here beside the graves of fifteen thousand men, whose lives were more significant than speech.” Continue reading

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather