How I Will Vote on Constitutional Amendments

Many times I am asked my opinion about various issues on the ballot. This year in Georgia we have four proposed amendments to ratify or reject.

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If you want to jump to a specific amendment, use the links below to go directly to the Proposed Amendment.

Proposed Amendment # 1 – Opportunity School District

Proposed Amendment # 2 – Georgia Additional Penalties for Sex Crimes to Fund Services for Sexually Exploited Children

Proposed Amendment # 3 – Georgia Replacement of the Judicial Qualifications Commission

Proposed Amendment # 4 – Uses of Revenue from Taxes on Fireworks

Just a little review on the process to amend the Constitution. A resolution to amend the Constitution must receive a 2/3 vote in the Georgia House of Representatives and the Georgia Senate. If the resolution meets that super majority in both House and Senate, then it goes to the voters to ratify by a simple majority. Continue reading

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Constitution Day and How We Have Strayed

On September 17, 1787, delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia signed the United States Constitution to send it to the states for ratification. The major issue in the discussion of the new Constitution was representation. States with larger population wanted representation based on population. States with smaller populations feared being overpowered by a few states and called for equal representation for each state.

The Connecticut Compromise gave us the legislative organization that we have today. The House of Representatives is based on population. The Senate provides two votes for each state regardless of size. This presents the unusual situation for seven states, Alaska, Delaware, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wyoming having more Senators than members in the House of Representatives. Continue reading

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Fifteen Years Later

Fifteen years ago we were viciously attacked.  The enemy was not a nation with a flag.  It was an ideology of hate and domination.  We witnessed heroic actions of Americans.

Today we remember and honor those who fell on that day as well as those who have since fallen in the war against terror. We pray for those who are still fighting that war.
On that day in 2001 and the days following, America came together.  Images of fire fighters raising the American flag in the rubble of the Twin Towers displayed our resolve. Continue reading

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Veterans Group Questions Bishop’s Military Service

A Veterans group blog site recently filed a Freedom of Information request regarding Congressman Sanford Bishop’s claim to be an Army veteran. They posted the response on their blog and the Facebook page of the 2nd District Republican Party.

Congressman Bishop’s official biography reads, “He served in the U.S. Army from 1969 to 1971; completed basic training at Fort Benning, Georgia, entered Advanced Reserve Officers Training, and received an Honorable Discharge in 1971.” Continue reading

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